Coupon Language: “One Per”, BOGO, and More!

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coupon language

Coupon Language: “One Per”, BOGO, and More!

Coupons can really make a difference in your family budget if you understand how to use them. So, let’s talk coupon lingo. Have you ever read the verbiage on a coupon and been like “Ah….Holy cow! What is that suppose to mean?” I am here to explain it in plain basic terms!

THE “ONE PER” RULE

ONE COUPON PER TRANSACTION. What is a transaction? One transaction is completed each time you pay for your products and get a receipt. If you aren’t currently using coupons, you probably only do one transaction each time you are shopping. So, this means that you can only use one coupon each time you make a transaction. If you have three of the same cereal coupon, you would need to make three separate transactions in order to use all of them.

ONE COUPON PER PURCHASE. When a coupon contains this verbiage, it means that you can use one coupon for each item you purchase. So, if you have a three $1/1 coupons for cereal, you can purchase three boxes of cereal and use all three coupons in one transaction.

ONE COUPON PER VISIT. If your coupon states this, then you can only use one coupon each time you walk into the establishment. Going back to our three cereal coupons as our example – you can only use one of that coupon each time you go to the store. You would need to leave and re-enter the store to use more than one on the same day.

ONE PER CUSTOMER. Some coupons limit usage to one per customer. This is just as it is written. Each customer is limited to using the coupon once. You can leave and return and use another, just not within the same transaction or visit.

BUY ONE, GET ONE

BUY ONE, GET ONE FREE: When you buy the specified item as listed on the coupon, you can get a second specified item for free.

With most BUY ONE, GET ONE FREE coupons, the manufacturer puts a monetary value limit on your free item. For example, it may say “not to exceed $4.99”. If the shelf price of the item that should be free is $5.09, you will be responsible for the difference of $0.10.

BUY ONE, GET ONE AT “X” DISCOUNT: Some coupons will allow you to purchase one item at full price and then your next item can be a set dollar value or percentage off. The most common is a 50% discount (ie: Buy 1, Get 1 50% Off).

“REDEEMABLE AT”

Some manufacturer coupons will say “Redeemable at …” with a store listed. This is only a suggestion. It does not mean the coupon is valid ONLY at those stores. Now, if it says “Redeemable only at …” then, you may only use it at the store listed.

Most stores will accept these coupons, however, there are some (including Dollar General), that will not accept a manufacturer coupon that says “Redeemable at …” or has another stores logo. You will need to consult the store’s coupon policy to be sure.

PICTURES

When you look at the coupon, you should completely disregard the photo you see printed on it. Why? The wording identifies what product(s) the coupon can be used on. Many manufacturer’s will put a photo of the most expensive item in the product line in hopes you will use it on that item.

Find more Couponing Tips and Tricks on Become a Coupon Queen!

Comments

  1. Someone needs to show or teach cashiers this language. The only time I ever have problems while using coupons, it’s because the cashier doesn’t understand the fine print. All they see is one coupon per purchase lol its frustrating trying to explain it. They don’t even try to understand.

    • I totally understand, Demeka! Just yesterday, I had to tell a cashier that “available at Walmart” doesn’t mean that the coupon is only “redeemable at Walmart”. Luckily, she took what I said as truth and put the coupon through.

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